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The Old Supreme Court Chamber is the first room constructed for the use of the nation's highest judiciary body and was used by the Court from 1810 until 1860. Built by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, it was a significant architectural achievement, for the size and structure of its vaulted, semicircular ceiling were virtually unprecedented in the United States.
The Old Supreme Court Chamber is the first room constructed for the use of the...

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The Summerhouse on the Capitol Grounds surrounded by pink azalea flowers.
A few ideas to help you in planning a visit to Capitol Hill.

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Photo of Capitol Hill steps.
Download a PDF of the full list.

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The AOC partners with the Phelps Architecture, Construction and Engineering High School in northeast Washington, D.C.
As volunteers, the time commitment for AOC employees who mentor is not huge,...

Our Blog

Read a blog about the art, architecture and work on the Capitol Hill written by AOC's experts.

Beyond the Dome – Packard Campus of the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center

Posted by Erin Nelson on June 3, 2013

Nitrate vault at the Library of Congress Packard Campus
The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is responsible for managing all of the buildings and grounds on Capitol Hill, but it also maintains several facilities across the National Capital Region. One such facility is the Library of Congress Packard Campus of the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, located 80 miles away from the Capitol in Culpeper, Virginia. I recently had the privilege to peak inside this fascinating facility.

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Moving Offices. Improving Lives.

Posted by Franklin Bradley on May 23, 2013

Melvin Wells has applied what they learned at SOME to excel at AOC.
AOC's partnership with So Others Might Eat (SOME) helps "empower people out of homelessness and poverty" with their Center for Employment Training.

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A "Slight" Capitol Contribution

Posted by Kristen Frederick on May 13, 2013

The United States Capitol in 1846, with its original dome designed by Charles Bulfinch
Throughout the U.S. Capitol Building’s 220-year history, there have been many workers who have labored in obscurity, their names forever lost to the passage of time. Recently when I was researching the third Architect of the Capitol, Charles Bulfinch, I stumbled across a Capitol worker with an interesting (and largely forgotten) story.

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A Few of My Favorite Things

Posted by Sharon Gang on April 22, 2013

"Celebration of the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, . . . April 19, 1866," wood engraving by Frank Dielman, Harper's Weekly, May 12, 1866
Sharon Gang, Communications & Marketing Manager for the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) explores the CVC’s new exhibit, Conflict and Compromise.

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More Historically Accurate: Lincoln or Vampire Hunter?

Posted by Matt Guilfoyle on April 15, 2013

Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural at the U.S. Capitol
AOC Public Affairs Officer Matt Guilfoyle watches "Lincoln" and "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter"-- and is surprised by which film more accurately depicts the U.S. Capitol.

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Squirrels on Capitol Grounds

Posted by Andria Leo on April 11, 2013

Squirrels on the Capitol Grounds
When walking across the Capitol Grounds there is one critter that can consistently be seen out and about – the squirrel. When did squirrels first come to Washington, D.C. and how did they end up here? Archivist Andria Leo took a look through AOC’s historical records to investigate the history of the squirrel at the Capitol.

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