Stewards of the iconic buildings and grounds of Capitol Hill since 1793.

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In the late 19th century the architectural style of the Thomas Jefferson Building was said to be "Italian Renaissance." Today, it is recognized as a premier example of the Beaux Arts style, which is theatrical, heavily ornamented and kinetic. It is a style perfectly suited to a young, wealthy, and imperialistic nation in its Gilded Age.
The Library of Congress began in 1800 with a small appropriation to buy...

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View of the U.S. Capitol Building from above at dusk
In order to ensure the safety of visitors and staff and to preserve the...

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AOC Gardener at the U.S. Botanic Gardener handling some orchids
Information about working for the Architect of the Capitol:

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War of 1812
The War of 1812 Tour: Three Points of View Weekdays at 11 a.m. – Join a...

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June 07 By: Lori Taylor 0 Comments
Meet the AOC's decorative painters at the Library of Congress who work to preserve the ornate designs of one of the world's most beautiful buildings. Go behind the scenes to see the...
June 03 By: Erin Nelson 0 Comments
Nitrate vault at the Library of Congress Packard Campus
The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is responsible for managing all of the buildings and grounds on Capitol Hill, but it also maintains several facilities across the National Capital Region. One such...
May 13 By: Kristen Frederick 2 Comments
The United States Capitol in 1846, with its original dome designed by Charles Bulfinch
Throughout the U.S. Capitol Building’s 220-year history, there have been many workers who have labored in obscurity, their names forever lost to the passage of time. Recently when I was researching...
April 22 By: Sharon Gang 0 Comments
"Celebration of the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, . . . April 19, 1866," wood engraving by Frank Dielman, Harper's Weekly, May 12, 1866
Sharon Gang, Communications & Marketing Manager for the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) explores the CVC’s new exhibit, Conflict and Compromise.

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