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James A. Garfield

James A. Garfield
Charles H. Niehaus
Artist

Marble
Given by Ohio in 1886
Rotunda
U.S. Capitol

Overview 

This statue of James Garfield was given to the National Statuary Hall Collection in the U.S. Capitol by Ohio in 1886. Garfield was the 20th President of the United States, serving from 1881 until he died from a gunshot wound 200 days later.

James Abram Garfield, born November 19, 1831, was the last American president to be born in a log cabin. He grew up in poverty and first tried his hand at being a frontier farmer. He was able to finish his studies, first at Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (Hiram College) and later at Williams College; he was just under 30. In 1859 Garfield was elected to the Ohio Senate as a Republican. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1860.

Garfield became a major general in the Union Army during the Civil War and served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1863 to 1880, where he served on the Military Affairs Committee and the Ways and Means Committee and became an expert in public finance. He was a firm supporter of backing money with gold, but not a strong supporter of a high tariff. Garfield was elected to the Senate in 1880 but never served, as he also was elected president. His short presidency was quite stormy due to the numerous political problems he inherited. He also generated some of his own by personally making even the most minor political appointment in his administration, and his selection of moderate Republicans angered the conservative faction known as the “Stalwarts.”

On July 2, 1881, President Garfield was shot in a Washington railroad station, located on the Mall, by Charles J. Guiteau, a disappointed office seeker. Garfield died from his gunshot wound 11 weeks later on September 19, 1881.

He is also honored with a monument on Capitol Grounds.

Last Updated: January 03, 2014