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This painting by Allyn Cox depicts the cornerstone laying ceremony and is currently on display in the House Wing of the U.S. Capitol Building.
The cornerstone was laid on Wednesday, September 18, 1793, during the first...

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View of the U.S. Capitol Building from above at dusk
In order to ensure the safety of visitors and staff and to preserve the...

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An AOC worker mowing the grass on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol
The roles and responsibilities of the Architect of the Capitol cover an...

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Band Photo
Evenings at the Conservatory are magical! Join us Tuesdays and Thursdays...

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Exhibition Hall Talks in Honor of Black History Month 2014

Event Location: 
Capitol Visitor Center
Exhibition Hall Talks in Honor of Black History Month 2014

Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level of the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center for 15-minute programs in honor of Black History Month.

Thursday, February 6 1 p.m.
Adam Berenbak, Archivist, Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives, focuses on the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a towering achievement of legislation that finally delivered on the promise of the Fifteenth Amendment by guaranteeing the right to vote to previously disenfranchised African-Americans.Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level for this 15-minute program.  No reservations or passes required.
 
Wednesday, February 19 1 p.m.
Ka'mal McClarin, Museum Curator at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, talks about Frederick Douglass and how he recognized literacy and education as basic civil rights. Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level for this 15-minute program.  No reservations or passes required.
 
Thursday, February 20 1 p.m.
Betty Koed, Associate Historian for the United States Senate, discusses Senator Charles Sumner and the civil rights legislation of the Reconstruction Era. Legislators drafted constitutional amendments abolishing slavery and giving voting rights to black men, while Sumner pursued a more comprehensive civil rights agenda for African Americans. His efforts resulted in the Civil Rights Act of 1875, but it would take nearly a century for Sumner’s vision to be realized with broader civil rights for African Americans. Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level for this 15-minute program.  No reservations or passes required.
 
Thursday, February 27 1 p.m.
Matthew Wasniewski, Historian for the United States House of Representatives, discusses the failed 1875 Civil Rights Bill as a prelude to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level for this 15-minute program. No reservations or passes required.

Learn about more special activities at the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center.

Event Tags: 
Educational Events