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A Cascade of Books by Frank Eliscu (1912–1996) is a bronze sculptural screen that rises five stories above the main entrance to the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress. Measuring approximately 50 feet high by 35 feet wide, it consists of 98 open books, with some as large as five feet wide.
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Painted portrait of Dr. William Thornton
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Photo of Dr. Michael Balick, Vice President and Director, Institute of Economic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden
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Exhibition Hall Talks in Honor of Black History Month 2014

Event Location: 
Capitol Visitor Center
Exhibition Hall Talks in Honor of Black History Month 2014

Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level of the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center for 15-minute programs in honor of Black History Month.

Thursday, February 6 1 p.m.
Adam Berenbak, Archivist, Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives, focuses on the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a towering achievement of legislation that finally delivered on the promise of the Fifteenth Amendment by guaranteeing the right to vote to previously disenfranchised African-Americans.Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level for this 15-minute program.  No reservations or passes required.
 
Wednesday, February 19 1 p.m.
Ka'mal McClarin, Museum Curator at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, talks about Frederick Douglass and how he recognized literacy and education as basic civil rights. Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level for this 15-minute program.  No reservations or passes required.
 
Thursday, February 20 1 p.m.
Betty Koed, Associate Historian for the United States Senate, discusses Senator Charles Sumner and the civil rights legislation of the Reconstruction Era. Legislators drafted constitutional amendments abolishing slavery and giving voting rights to black men, while Sumner pursued a more comprehensive civil rights agenda for African Americans. His efforts resulted in the Civil Rights Act of 1875, but it would take nearly a century for Sumner’s vision to be realized with broader civil rights for African Americans. Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level for this 15-minute program.  No reservations or passes required.
 
Thursday, February 27 1 p.m.
Matthew Wasniewski, Historian for the United States House of Representatives, discusses the failed 1875 Civil Rights Bill as a prelude to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Meet at the entrance to Exhibition Hall on the lower level for this 15-minute program. No reservations or passes required.

Learn about more special activities at the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center.

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