Stewards of the iconic buildings and grounds of Capitol Hill since 1793.

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Black and white picture of Frederick Law Olmsted  best known for designing the grounds of New York City’s Central Park, the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., the Biltmore Estate in North Carolina, and the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago.
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A virtual Map of Capitol Hill from above
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AOC employee assembling a bunch of tiny American flags for a display
Information for Small Businesses interested in doing business with the...

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Sustainability Accomplishments

Sustainability Accomplishments

Through a successful sustainability and energy program, the Architect of the Capitol (AOC) has annually exceeded its energy reduction goals outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) and the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005). The AOC is on pace to meet its 30 percent energy intensity reduction by the end of Fiscal Year 2015. In addition to energy reductions, AOC’s program efforts include progress sustainability components that strengthen the AOC’s facilities and help manage change for buildings designed without modern technologies in mind.

A graph showing the Annual Energy Reduction

Sustainability Accomplishments 

$2.7 Million: Dollars saved through new energy reductions
$14 Million: In building energy improvements re-allocated from utility accounts
20%: Reduction in our greenhouse gas footprint from FY 2008 baseline
25%: Energy reduction from FY 2003 baseline, exceeding the FY 2013 goal
6 Million: Square footage of buildings retro-commissioned
85 Million: Gallons of water saved from FY 2007 baseline
230: Meters installed

In FY 2013the AOC saved enough energy to: 

  • Power the entire campus 1 out of every 4 days
  • Power the Madison and U.S. Capitol Buildings (over 3 million square feet of space) for an entire year