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Doing Good

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By laura.condeluci | May 16, 2018
Although the sign on LaTisha Williams' desk reads, "Solutions Please," it could just as easily say, "Find Encouragement Here." With a ready smile that radiates warmth, Williams is always quick to serve and to praise others, with a personality that draws colleagues, employees and friends toward her
Behind the Scenes

Article

By sharon.gang | December 17, 2012
You never forget your first real job. A good one, with a good mentor, can ingrain work habits that will be carried with you throughout your career. My first job after college was on Capitol Hill working as a staff assistant for then-Rep. Daniel K. Akaka. At the end of the 112th Congress, now-Senator
Doing Good

Article

By justin.kieffer | August 16, 2017
One person's small act of compassion can start a chain reaction of kindness. Such is the story of a 16-year-old girl named Brittney James, who saw a commercial on TV and decided to sponsor a three-year-old Kenyan named Newton. Brittney hoped to one day meet Newton, but three years later she was
Doing Good

Article

By sharon.gang | March 29, 2016
Paddle. Fish. Heal. "I like helping people, and veterans are at the top of the list of people I want to help." Before Electrician Martin Blanchet joined the Architect of the Capitol (AOC) in 2003, he had served in the Army twice, first from 1984 to 1988 and then from 1997 to 2003. His service
History & Discoveries

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By sarah.davis | July 3, 2018
"America the Beautiful" began as a poem by Katharine Lee Bates in 1893. It was later combined with music by Samuel Augustus Ward to form the patriotic song many of us know today. I've been thinking of this song often with the July Fourth holiday coming up, and interpretations of its lyrics are
History & Discoveries

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By sarah.davis | November 20, 2017
The fall season is known for cooler weather, leaves changing colors, football, apple picking and pumpkins. With Thanksgiving upon us this week, I also can't help but think of family, turkey and pie. Another traditional symbol of the upcoming holiday is the cornucopia. A cornucopia is often used to
History & Discoveries

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By erin.courtney | October 31, 2017
On Friday, October 13, I took a stairwell down two levels below the U.S. Capitol basement, entered a locked storage area, climbed a ladder into the air shaft below the House Extension and carefully shimmied through the dark and dusty bowels of the building. Rounding a corner, Architect of the
History & Discoveries

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By erin.courtney | October 21, 2016
Working on Capitol Hill you hear your fair share of myths, mysteries and folklore about the historic buildings and its previous (we think) inhabitants. Given that the Capitol was once expected to be the final resting place for George Washington, replete with a crypt, should we be surprised that
History & Discoveries

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By erin.courtney | October 7, 2016
It's been more than 500 years since Christopher Columbus sailed the ocean blue in search of a direct water route from Europe to Asia. He never did discover that passage, but he did stumble upon the Americas and kicked off centuries of exploration, and exploitation, of the western hemisphere
History & Discoveries

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By erin.courtney | May 6, 2016
In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed a measure officially establishing the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day. From historical figures to allegorical representations, images of women are found throughout the U.S. Capitol Building in the art and architecture. While not the only mother in the
History & Discoveries

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By erin.courtney | March 17, 2016
According to the U.S. Census, about 33 million Americans claim Irish ancestry – that's about five times the population of the entire Emerald Isle. March is Irish-American Heritage Month and the President issues a proclamation commemorating the occasion each year. For Americans of Irish heritage
History & Discoveries

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By andrew.dentamaro | February 10, 2016
Initiated by Historian Carter G. Woodson in 1915, National African American History Month, also known as Black History Month, marks a time to celebrate and reflect upon the role that African Americans have played in shaping the course of our country's history. The compelling account of physical
History & Discoveries

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By franklin.bradley | March 10, 2016
As the temperature cooled down this winter, we asked Architect of the Capitol (AOC) employees to join a hot (and friendly) competition – AOC Cool Tools – and share the cool tools they use to get their jobs done. Every employee, in every job we do, uses tools, from a crane that lifts heavy loads to
History & Discoveries

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By aoc.curator | September 24, 2013
This is the first in a series of articles, written by the Architect of the Capitol's Curator Office, about the use of nature in the art and architecture of the U.S. Capitol. The architecture of ancient Greece and Rome that inspired the United States Capitol’s early architects and builders is noted
History & Discoveries

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By sharon.gang | July 21, 2014
Although I read Anne Frank's diary years ago, it wasn't until May of this year that I had the opportunity to visit the secret annex in Amsterdam where Anne, along with family members and friends, hid from the Nazis for two years. While I was in Holland, a tree was planted in Anne's honor on the
History & Discoveries

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By aoc.curator | May 6, 2019
Constantino Brumidi, born in Rome in 1805, was fully trained in classical and Renaissance painting techniques, including true fresco. He painted murals for Popes and princes and was considered one of the city's best artists. In 1852 he emigrated to the United States. In 1855, after painting a trial
History & Discoveries

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By erin.nelson | July 17, 2013
The Architect of the Capitol is responsible for managing all of the buildings and grounds on Capitol Hill, but we also maintain several facilities across the National Capital Region, including several off-site facilities in Fort Meade, Maryland. I recently had the chance to visit Fort Meade and view
History & Discoveries

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By lori.taylor | July 9, 2013
"We deal with a lot of history." No, those aren't the words of the Architect of the Capitol's (AOC) Curator office. It's Ron Bailey, shop supervisor of the Library Buildings and Grounds Elevator Division, who runs some of the oldest elevator systems on Capitol Hill, the oldest of which date back to
History & Discoveries

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By sharon.gang | June 25, 2013
Sharon Gang, Communications & Marketing Manager for the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) lists some lesser known highlights not to miss when you visit the United States Capitol. Most visitors are drawn to admire the obvious “big ticket” items at the U.S. Capitol Building – the Rotunda paintings, the
History & Discoveries

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By matt.guilfoyle | June 18, 2013
Control of the office thermostat – an office debate that has probably existed since the first one was installed – becomes even more "heated" in humid Washington summers. Too hot or too cold – there is no pleasing everyone, but while today the AOC provides a climate-controlled environment to the
Behind the Scenes

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By matt.guilfoyle | June 10, 2013
The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) plays a leadership role in decisions from the policing of Capitol Hill; to national standards of historic preservation; to supporting development of industry standards in fire safety, capital project management and security infrastructure. AOC's involvement falls
History & Discoveries

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By erin.nelson | June 3, 2013
The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is responsible for managing all of the buildings and grounds on Capitol Hill, but it also maintains several facilities across the National Capital Region. One such facility is the Library of Congress Packard Campus of the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center
History & Discoveries

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By matt.guilfoyle | November 6, 2013
Long before the advent of Twitter, Facebook and blogs – there were journals. 150 years ago this month saw one of the most transformative periods in the construction of the United States Capitol along with the historic address by Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg. One individual captured these events
History & Discoveries

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By erin.nelson | October 18, 2017
The O'Neill House Office Building was constructed in the early 1960s. Originally known as Federal Office Building No. 8, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to name the building after the late former Speaker of the House Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill in 2012. Federal Office Building No. 8 was the Food
Programs & Events

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By devin.dotson | August 6, 2019
This newly donated collection — the second largest single donation in U.S. Botanic Garden (USBG) history — adds to the rich heritage and importance of the USBG's orchid collection.
Doing Good

Article

By devin.dotson | November 6, 2018
Armed to Urban Farm is a new program presented by the U.S. Botanic Garden and the National Center for Appropriate Technology to teach veterans about urban farming careers.
Programs & Events

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By devin.dotson | December 22, 2017
If you stop by the U.S. Botanic Garden (USBG) through New Year's Day, you can see 'Jingle Bell' (pictured, above right) and 'Jingle Bell Rock' that are red with pink or white splashes. You might also enjoy finding 'Peppermint Ruffles' with its pink tones or 'Autumn Leaves' displaying unexpected
History & Discoveries

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By devin.dotson | October 25, 2017
Bartholdi Park is a wonderful spot for eating lunch, finding a new favorite plant, enjoying a quiet moment and taking a break from a busy day. Originally created in 1932, the U.S. Botanic Garden's (USBG) Bartholdi Park had served as a changing home demonstration garden for more than 80 years, and
History & Discoveries

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By devin.dotson | June 21, 2016
This fall, the National Garden at the United States Botanic Garden (USBG) turns 10 years old. Opened to the public on October 1, 2006, the National Garden is a key element of the USBG, along with the Conservatory and Bartholdi Park. The National Garden's Rose Garden celebrates the national floral
Programs & Events

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By usbg.staff | July 16, 2015
Later this month marks the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While many cultural institutions across the country will celebrate this significant milestone, it is also a time to reflect and look forward. The U.S. Botanic Garden (USBG) is committed to welcoming every