Stewards of the iconic buildings and grounds of Capitol Hill since 1793.

Featured

William Henry Powell’s painting of the Discovery of the Mississippi by De Soto shows Spanish conquistador and explorer Hernando De Soto (1500–1542), riding a white horse and dressed in Renaissance finery, arriving at the Mississippi River at a point below Natchez on May 8, 1541.
William Henry Powell’s dramatic and brilliantly colored canvas was the last of...

Featured

A crowd of people visiting the Capitol during visitor hours
Visitor Hours for the Buildings on Capitol Hill.

Featured

Stewardship
The Architect of the Capitol is committed to the preservation and stewardship...

Featured

Military Band Concert
The 2014 series of concerts will be inaugurated by the Navy Band on Monday,...

History of the Rayburn House Office Building

History of the Rayburn House Office Building

History of the Rayburn House Office Building
Overview 

The Rayburn House Office Building, completed in early 1965, is the third of three office buildings constructed for the United States House of Representatives. Earlier efforts to provide space for the House of Representatives had included the construction of the Cannon Building and the Longworth Building.

In March 1955 Speaker Sam Rayburn introduced an amendment for a third House office building, although no site had been identified, no architectural study had been done, and no plans prepared. The Architect of the Capitol, J. George Stewart, with the approval of the House Office Building Commission, selected the firm of Harbeson, Hough, Livingston and Larson of Philadelphia to design a simplified, classical building in architectural harmony with other Capitol Hill structures. The cornerstone was laid in May 1962, and full occupancy of the building began in February 1965.

Last Updated: May 09, 2012