Featured

In the late 19th century the architectural style of the Thomas Jefferson Building was said to be "Italian Renaissance." Today, it is recognized as a premier example of the Beaux Arts style, which is theatrical, heavily ornamented and kinetic. It is a style perfectly suited to a young, wealthy, and imperialistic nation in its Gilded Age.
The Library of Congress began in 1800 with a small appropriation to buy...

Featured

The Summerhouse on the Capitol Grounds surrounded by pink azalea flowers.
A few ideas to help you in planning a visit to Capitol Hill.

Featured

Photo of Capitol Hill steps.
Download a PDF of the full list.

Featured

East Front Plaza Repairs
AOC is making repairs to expansion joints on the East Front Plaza of the...

Explore Capitol Hill

Ethan Allen

Overview 

This statue of Ethan Allen was given to the National Statuary Hall Collection by Vermont in 1876. Allen was born in 1738 and died in February, 1789. He is best remembered as the Founder of the State of Vermont.

Larkin G. Mead
Artist

Marble
Given by Vermont in 1876
National Statuary Hall
U.S. Capitol

White marble statues of Ethan Allen

Founder of the State of Vermont, Ethan Allen was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, on January 21, 1738. As an explorer, he became involved in the "Hampshire Grants" dispute regarding conflicting land claims between New Hampshire and New York. As a result of the 1770 New York Supreme Court decision invalidating the New Hampshire grants, the settlers formed the Green Mountain Boys with Allen as their colonel commander to defend their property. The skirmishes escalated to such a degree that Allen was outlawed by Governor George Clinton of New York in 1771.

During the Revolutionary War, Allen and his Green Mountain Boys joined forces with Colonel Benedict Arnold to capture Fort Ticonderoga on May 10, 1775. While invading British-held Canada with Colonel John Brown, Allen was captured on September 25, 1775, and held prisoner for two years before being exchanged. He immediately received the brevet rank of colonel in the Continental Army.

He returned to Vermont and was made major general in the Vermont militia. Allen petitioned the Continental Congress for Vermont's statehood. When refused, he negotiated with Britain over the status of Vermont and was accused of treason. Allen died on February 12, 1789, two years before Vermont was admitted into the Union.


Download pdf of this article.

Last Updated: September 24, 2014