Stewards of the iconic buildings and grounds of Capitol Hill since 1793.

Featured

TPainting depicting ceremony in which Pocahontas was baptized and given the name Rebecca
This painting depicts the ceremony in which Pocahontas, daughter of the...

Featured

Screenshot of Google Maps image of United States Capitol and surrounding areas.
Located at the center of Washington, D.C., the U.S. Capitol Building and other...

Featured

AOC members holding the Historic Preservation Award that they received
The Architect of the Capitol strives to perform all work at a high level of...

Featured

The Flanagan clock with marble columns in the background
In a world where everyone carries a cell phone and some carry more than one,...

George Laird Shoup

George Laird Shoup statue
Frederick E. Triebel
Artist

Marble
Given by Idaho in 1910
National Statuary Hall
U.S. Capitol

Overview 

This statue of George Laird Shoup was given by Idaho in 1910 to the National Statuary Hall Collection. Shoup was the first governor of the state of Idaho and served in the U.S. Senate from 1890-1901.

George Laird Shoup was born in Kittaning, Pennsylvania, on June 15, 1836. The financial panic of 1857 left the family with virtually nothing. Two years later, Shoup went to the Colorado Territory to engage in mining and merchandising near Pike's Peak. During the Civil War he enlisted with the independent scouts working in New Mexico, Colorado and Texas. He was commissioned colonel when the Third Colorado Cavalry was formed and took part in the battles of Apache Cañon and Sand Creek.

After the war Shoup moved to Virginia City, Montana, and then settled in Salmon, Idaho, a city that he helped found. Shoup was appointed commissioner to organize Lemhi County, and in 1874 he was elected to the territorial legislature. With few interruptions, he served on the Republican National Committee for Idaho from 1880 to 1904. On April 1, 1889, President Harrison appointed him governor of Idaho Territory; he was elected governor after the ratification of Idaho's statehood.

As a U.S. Senator from 1890 to 1901, his many interests included pensions, education, and military affairs. He was chairman of the Committee on Territories and he advocated liberal and just treatment of the Indians. Three years after his defeat in 1901, Shoup died in Boise, Idaho, on December 21, 1904.

Last Updated: October 10, 2014