Stewards of the iconic buildings and grounds of Capitol Hill since 1793.

Featured

This painting depicts Christopher Columbus and members of his crew on a beach in the West Indies, newly landed from his flagship Santa Maria on October 12, 1492.
This painting depicts Christopher Columbus and members of his crew on a beach...

Featured

View of the U.S. Capitol Building from above at dusk
In order to ensure the safety of visitors and staff and to preserve the...

Featured

Fall 2014 Cover Image
The Architect of the Capitol magazine, Foundations & Perspectives,...

Featured

Earth Day Celebration at the U.S. Botanic Garden
Join the United States Botanic Garden for an Earth Day Celebration on the...

John Hanson

John Hanson
Richard E. Brooks
Artist

Bronze
Given by Maryland in 1903
Hall of Columns
U.S. Capitol

Overview 

This statue of John Hanson was given to the National Statuary Hall Collection by Maryland in 1903. Hanson was one of the strongest colonial advocates of independence.

John Hanson was born in Charles County, Maryland, on April 3, 1715. While serving in the Maryland Assembly from 1757 to 1773 he was active in raising troops and providing arms. In 1779 Hanson served as a delegate to the Continental Congress, where he helped to resolve the western lands issue, thereby facilitating the ratification of the Articles of Confederation.

From 1781 to 1782 he was "President of the United States in Congress Assembled" under the Articles of Confederation. As the presiding officer of Congress, Hanson was responsible for initiating a number of programs that helped America gain a world position. During his tenure the first consular service was established, a post office department was initiated, a national bank was chartered, progress was made towards taking the first census, and a uniform system of coinage was adopted. As "President," Hanson also signed a treaty with Holland affirming the indebtedness of the United States for a loan from that country. In addition, he signed all laws, regulations, official papers and letters.

Hanson died on November 15, 1783, at the age of 68. His contributions to the government under the Articles of Confederation were absorbed by the new federal government.


Download pdf of this article.

Last Updated: February 24, 2014