Stewards of the iconic buildings and grounds of Capitol Hill since 1793.

Featured

Winston Churchill Bust is made of bronze and was unveiled in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on October 30, 2013. The bust is located in the small House Rotunda on the first floor of the U.S. Capitol.
The bronze bust of Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965) was unveiled in a...

Featured

A crowd of people visiting the Capitol during visitor hours
Please note: Many of these Capitol Hill buildings are working office buildings...

Featured

Photo of a Capitol Power Plant chiller that's reaching the end of its life expectancy.
Fiscal Year 2016 Appropriations With the support of Congress, the Architect of...

Featured

Photo of the U.S. Capitol Building, West Front, Early April 2014.
A multi-phased project designed to address deferred maintenance, extend the...

Richard Stockton

Richard Stockton
Henry Kirke Brown (completed by H.K. Bush-Brown)
Artist

Marble
Given by New Jersey in 1888
Crypt
U.S. Capitol

Overview 

This statue of Richard Stockton was given to the National Statuary Hall Collection by New Jersey in 1888.

An illustrious lawyer, jurist, legislator and signer of the Declaration of Independence, Richard Stockton, born on October 1, 1730, initially showed little interest in politics. He once wrote, "The publick is generally unthankful, and I never will become a Servant of it, till I am convinced that by neglecting my own affairs I am doing more acceptable Service to God and Man." Stockton did, however, take an active role as a trustee of the College of New Jersey (Princeton).

In 1768 Stockton had his first taste of government service when he was appointed to the governing Council of New Jersey; he was later (1774) appointed to the New Jersey Supreme Court. He first took a moderate stance in the troubles between the colonies and England. He did not favor separation; rather, he suggested in 1764 that some colonial members be appointed to the Parliament. However, he changed his position a year later when the controversy over the Stamp Act arose. In 1774 he drafted and sent to Lord Dartmouth "a plan of self-government for America, independent of Parliament, without renouncing allegiance to the Crown."

In 1776 Stockton was elected to the Continental Congress, where he took a very active role. Shortly after he signed the Declaration of Independence, he was taken prisoner by the British. Although he remained in prison for only a month, his health was broken. He became an invalid and died at Princeton on February 28, 1781.

Download pdf of this article.

Last Updated: February 24, 2014