Featured

In Emanuel Leutze’s mural, a group of pioneers and their train of covered wagons are pictured at the continental divide, looking towards the sunset and the Pacific Ocean. The border depicts vignettes of exploration and frontier mythology. Beneath the central composition is a panoramic view of their destination “Golden Gate,” in San Francisco Bay.
Emanuel Leutze’s mural celebrates the western expansion of the United States....

Featured

The Summerhouse on the Capitol Grounds surrounded by pink azalea flowers.
A few ideas to help you in planning a visit to Capitol Hill.

Featured

Painted portrait of Dr. William Thornton
The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is the builder and steward of America’s...

Featured

Military Bands Summer Concert Series 2014
The 2014 series of concerts will be inaugurated by the Navy Band on Monday,...

Explore Capitol Hill

Edward Lewis Bartlett

Overview 

This statue of Edward Lewis Bartlett was given to the National Statuary Hall Collection by Alaska in 1971. Bartlett served as Alaska's first senator after the state's admission to the union in 1959.

Felix W. de Weldon
Artist

Bronze
Given by Alaska in 1971
House connecting corridor, 2nd floor
U.S. Capitol

Edward Lewis Bartlett statue

Edward Lewis Bartlett was born on April 20, 1904, in Seattle, Washington. After graduating from the University of Alaska in 1925, Bartlett began his career in politics. A reporter for the Fairbanks Daily News until 1933, he accepted the position of secretary to Delegate Anthony Dimond of Alaska. Three years later he became the chairman of the Unemployment Compensation Commission of Alaska.

On January 30, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed him secretary of the Alaska Territory. Beginning in 1945, Bartlett served as the delegate from Alaska to the 79th and the six succeeding Congresses. Continuing his civic service, he was president of the Alaska Tuberculosis Association and served as a member of the Alaska War Council. He labored constantly for statehood; upon Alaska's admission to the Union in 1959 he became the first senator from Alaska and served until 1967.

Bartlett possessed the reputation of a quiet man of achievement. The Library of Congress estimates that he had more bills passed into law than any other member in congressional history. Some of his bills included the Radiation Safety Bill and the Bartlett Act, requiring all federally funded buildings to be accessible to the handicapped. Well-loved and respected by his constituents as well as his peers, Bartlett died December 11, 1968.


Download pdf of this article.

Last Updated: October 10, 2014