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George Washington Glick (Replaced)

Overview 

The statue of George Washington Glick represented Kansas in the National Statuary Hall Collection from 1914-2003. In 2003 the statue was replaced by one of Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Charles H. Niehaus
Artist

Marble
Given by Kansas in 1914
Replaced in 2003 by statue of Dwight D. Eisenhower

George Washington Glick statue

George Washington Glick, born July 4, 1827, was raised on his father's farm near Fremont, Ohio. At age 21 he entered the law offices of Buckland and Hayes (later President Rutherford B. Hayes); he was admitted to the bar two years later and established a moderate law practice, earning a reputation as a hard-working lawyer. Glick moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1859 and formed a partnership with Alfred P. Otis. He served as a Union soldier in the 2nd Kansas Regiment during the Civil War. He worked for the adoption of the Kansas constitution. Elected to the state legislature in 1862, he served for 14 of the next 18 years and was Speaker pro tempore in 1876. Glick was well respected and considered "just and expert" by his colleagues.

He was elected Governor in 1882 and served until 1885. Legislation enacted during his tenure included the creation of a railroad commission, a "good roads" law, reassessment of tax laws, and the establishment of a livestock sanitary commission. He was later appointed pension agent in Topeka by President Cleveland.

After 15 years of civic service, George Glick was forced to abandon his political career because of a throat infection that nearly destroyed his ability to speak. He continued, however, as an attorney for various railroads. He also managed his farm and served as a charter member and first vice president of the Kansas Historical Society. He died on April 13, 1911.
In 2003 the state of Kansas replaced this statue with one of Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Last Updated: October 10, 2014