John Trumbull was an American painter, diplomat and architect. He is noted for his four large history paintings in the Capitol Rotunda, which depict pivotal moments before, during and after the Revolutionary War. He drew upon his own experiences and the personal acquaintances that he formed during the war to depict the places and people involved.

John Trumbull was born in Lebanon, Connecticut, on June 6, 1756, to a prominent and prosperous family. His father, Jonathan Trumbull, was later Governor of Connecticut (1769–1784). John graduated from Harvard College in 1773.

During his brief service as an officer and General Washington’s aide-de-camp during the Revolutionary War, he sketched significant people and places of the conflict. Resigning his commission as colonel in 1777, he continued to paint and then went to England, where he studied under renowned history painter Benjamin West and at the Royal Academy of Arts. During travels in London, Paris, and New York City, he painted scenes of the American Revolution and life portraits or sketches of many of the individuals who would appear in them.

Image
Artist John Trumbull portrait in the U.S. Capitol's Cox Corridors.
John Trumbull portrait in the U.S. Capitol's Cox Corridors.

After holding diplomatic postings in London from 1794 to 1804, Trumbull remained abroad for another 13 years. In 1817 he returned to America, and his portraits and exhibitions of his earlier canvases led to a commission for four large paintings to be placed in the Capitol Rotunda. Installed in 1826, they are:

Failing to secure a contract for the other four Rotunda paintings, Trumbull fell on several years of hard times. In 1831 he deeded many of his works to Yale College in exchange for an annuity.

Trumbull died in New York City on November 10, 1843, and was interred beneath the art gallery at Yale that he had designed. In 1867, his paintings and his remains were moved to the new art gallery (now Street Hall).

Art

Trumbull's Masterpieces

The artist's collection of work throughout Capitol Hill.

Declaration of Independence

This painting depicts the moment on June 28, 1776, when the first draft of the Declaration of Independence was presented to the Second Continental Congress.

General George Washington Resigning His Commission

The painting General George Washington Resigning His Commission by John Trumbull is on display in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol. This painting depicts the scene on Dec. 23, 1783, in the Maryland State House in Annapolis when George Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

Surrender of Lord Cornwallis

The painting Surrender of Lord Cornwallis by John Trumbull is on display in the Rotunda of the US Capitol. The subject of this painting is the surrender of the British army at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781, which ended the last major campaign of the Revolutionary War.

Recent News

Noteworthy Updates

History & Discoveries

The Architect of the Capitol Sweeps Up the Past

When Jim Kaufmann, Capitol Grounds and Arboretum Director, happened across an 1891 street-sweeping map while going through cultural landscape reports, he had no idea how simple an old map could make caring for the U.S. Capitol Grounds.
Public Notice

Volume 19 of Tholos Magazine Now Available

The latest edition of the Architect of the Capitol (AOC) employee magazine, Tholos, is now available. Article themes include Cool Tools, Organizational Transformation, Seasonal Highlight, Doing Good, Project Updates, and Spotlight on Safety.